MTL<30

Celebrating 30 years of microsystems technology at MIT

On October 29-20, 2014, we celebrated the numerous accomplishments of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology over the last 30 years and shared our dreams about the great potential of micro-and nano- technologies for years to come. This website exists as a snapshot of the event and its accompanying materials. We hope you enjoy this curated experience!

 

Want to see what happened? Misplaced your copy?

You can download and view a print-quality PDF of the MTL>30 program guide.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Cambridge Marriott Hotel, Kendall Square, Cambridge, MA

6:00pm

Reception

7:00pm

Dinner

Welcome

Jesús A. del Alamo, MTL Director & Donner Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

8:00pm

Opening Remarks

Charles G. Sodini, Clarence J. LeBel Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

L. Rafael Reif, President, MIT

8:10pm

Dinner Speaker

Robert Kahn, Chairman, CEO & President, Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI)
The Role of Infrastructure in Microsystems Development from Single Chips to Trillions of Interconnected Devices and Other Things

Dr. Kahn will discuss the important role that infrastructure plays in microsystems development. He will focus primarily on networking and network-based infrastructure such as the MOSIS system that enables researchers to access shared VLSI fabrication runs at low cost and the MEMS and Nanotechnology Exchange that helps researchers to implement MEMS/nanotechnology devices and systems. Dr. Kahn will discuss the application of such technology to a broad range of emerging needs such as the so-called “Internet of Things” along with the need for a framework that supports interoperability of heterogeneous systems.

—Professional Attire Suggested

Thursday, October 30, 2014

6th floor, media lab, Bldg. E14, MIT

8:30am

Opening Remarks

Jesús A. del Alamo, MTL Director & Donner Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

8:35am

Martin A. Schmidt, Provost, MIT

8:40am

Paul Gray, Professor Emeritus & President Emeritus, MIT

8:45am

Paul Penfield, Professor Emeritus, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

8:55am

Dimitri Antoniadis, Ray & Maria Stata Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT (via video)

Keynote Session

Session Chair: Charles G. Sodini, Clarence J. LeBel Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

9:00am

Keynote 1

Ahmad Bahai, Chief Technology Officer, Texas Instruments
Pervasive Solid State Electronics—Promises & Challenges

Astonishing progress in silicon devices and circuits and highly reliable mass manufacturing techniques have prompted unprecedented revolutions in electronics for the last 4 decades to the extent that electronics is increasingly permeating our life. While there is a lot more to be gained from silicon, clearly no exponential trend is forever. Therefore, a slower and possibly linear improvement in silicon performance will face a growing challenge to keep up with exponential demands. What does it mean for the future of ever-growing solid state electronics, or are there other exponents at work? A daunting challenge worth spending a talk on!

9:45am

Keynote 2

Jack Sun, Vice President of Research and Development & Chief Technology Officer, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company
Collaborative Semiconductor Innovation—The Next Frontiers

A holistic and energy-efficient 3Dx3D system scaling approach can provide most of the computation throughput and special functions required for emerging applications. It can extend semiconductor innovation into the next decade to enhance future lifestyles and drive the growth of the silicon-based nano-electronics industry. There are many new frontiers in 3D transistor, interconnect, specialty technology, 3D packaging, circuit design, system architecture, and applications with interesting opportunities and challenges ahead to be explored and conquered by a collaborative, synergistic, and symbiotic semiconductor ecosystem which unleashes innovation. Besides the internet of things (IoT), cloud computing, and big data analytics, we can imagine a bionic age emerging with digitally-enhanced or semiconductor-augmented vision, hearing, limbs, and many other capabilities, such as cognitive computing, universal translators, and brain wave interfaces/communications.

10:30am

Break

10:45am

Panel Discussion I: Education for the Future of Nanotechnology/Nanosystems Students

Moderator: Thomas H. Lee, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

This panel will feature a sample of our more established alumni to discuss their views on the most important features of their education in MTL and MIT that helped them with their career paths. Panelists have had careers in large, medium, and start-up companies both in microelectronics and other related fields as well as academic careers. The panel will be asked to project to the future and comment on the role of the modern research university in the next 30 years and their advice for current students.

Panelists:

Mark Allen, Alfred Fitler Moore Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Kush Gulati, Maxim Integrated Products
Vida Ilderem, Vice President, Intel Labs, Intel
Craig Keast, Associate Head, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
David White, Senior R&D Group Director, Cadence

12:15pm

Student/Postdoc Poster Presentations

(60-second “elevator” pitches)

Session Chair: Vicky Diadiuk, Associate Director, Microsystems Technology Laboratories, MIT

Anirban Basu
Luis Fernando Velásquez-García
+DEMO

A Portable X-ray Generator Using a High-Current Field Emission Cathode and a Reflection Anode for Absorption Imaging of low-Z materials

Andres Canales
Polina Anikeeva
+DEMO

Thermal Drawing of Minimally Invasive Neural Probes

Winston Chern
Judy Hoyt

Strained-Si/Strained-Ge Heterostructure Bilayer TFETs

Hugh Churchill
Pablo Jarillo-Herrero

Transport and Optoelectronics with Two-Dimensional Semiconductors

Matthew D’Asaro
Jeffrey Lang
+DEMO

Stretchable Pressure and Shear Sensitive Skin

Maggie Delano
Charles Sodini
+DEMO

A Portable Bioimpedance Spectroscopy Measurement System for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Management

Wenjing Fang
Jing Kong

Asymmetric Growth of Graphene on Copper Enclosure with Layer Control by Chemical Vapor Deposition

Dan Hanks
Evelyn Wang

Evaporation from Nanopores for High Heat Flux Thermal Management

Wei-Chun Hsu
Gang Chen
+DEMO

Ultrathin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells Enabled by Light-Trapping Nanostructures

Nathan Ickes
Anantha Chandrakasan

Self-powered Long-range Wireless Microsensors for Industrial Applications

Eric Jones
Silvija Gradečak

Quantifying Stress and Strain in Individual III-V Semiconducting Nano-Heterostructures

Jeong-Gil Kim
George Barbastathis

Double Cone Nanostructures for Ultimate Anti-reflectivity of Encapsulated Solar Cells

Seungbum Lim
David J. Perreault

High Frequency Power Conversion Architecture for Grid Interface

Jianqiang Lin
Jesús del Alamo
& Dimitri Antoniadis

Nanometer-scale InGaAs Transistors for Future Logic Applications

Vitor Manfrinato
Karl Berggren

Determining the Resolution Limits of Electron-Beam Lithography

Sang Hoon Nam
Nicholas Xuanlai Fang

Broadband Light Absorption Enhancement
of Ultrathin Titanium Oxide Film on Metallic Reflector for Solar Energy Devices

Farnaz Niroui
Vladimir Bulović

Tunneling Nanoelectromechanical Switches Based on Molecular Thin Films

Sabino Pietrangelo
Harry Lee
+DEMO

An Electronically Steered, Wearable Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound System

Ujwal Radhakrishna
Dimitri Antoniadis

Virtual-Source Model for GaN HEMTs: The Link Between Device Physics and GaN Circuit Design

Jorg Scholvin
Clifton G. Fonstad
& Ed Boyden

+DEMO

High-Density Electrode Arrays for Neural Recording

Katie Smyth
Sang-Gook Kim

Piezoelectric Micro Ultrasonic Transducers for Medical Imaging

Amr Suleiman
Vivienne Sze

Energy-Efficient Hardware for Object Detection

Xiaoxue Wang
Karen Gleason

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Sensors Based on Oxidative Chemical Vapor Deposition (OCVD)

Mark Weidman
William Tisdale

Well-ordered Quantum Dot Solids with Functional Ligands

Li Yu
Duane Boning

Understanding Variation in Semiconductor Processes, Devices, and Circuits

Hangbo Zhao
John Hart

Strain-Engineered Manufacturing of Freeform Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

Sungjae Ha & Lili Yu
Tomás Palacios
& Anantha Chandrakasan

2D-Electronics for Sensor Applications

12:45pm

Lunch & Student/Postdoc Poster Session & Live Demonstrations

1:45pm

Awards

1:50pm

MIT.nano: A Sneak Preview

Vladimir Bulovic, Fariborz Maseeh Professor and Associate Dean for Innovation, School of Engineering, MIT

In the spring of 2014, MIT announced the launch of MIT.nano, a new innovation space for exploration, education, prototyping, and translation of new nano/micro-scale ideas and technologies into the world. This new facility will be constructed in the heart of MIT campus (next to the great Dome) to house a comprehensive set of tools for nanoscale research. It will annually support technical endeavors of over 2000 researchers in a broad set of fields including energy, health, life sciences, materials, quantum sciences, electronics, photonics and manufacturing. MIT.nano will enable MIT researchers and our collaborators to address many urgent challenges that are beyond the range of existing technologies. The new building signifies the centrality of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomanufacturing for the needs of the 21st century, and will be a key innovation hub for the campus.

2:15Pm

Panel Discussion II: Vision for the Future of Nanotechnology

Moderator: Karen K. Gleason, Associate Provost, MIT

Nanotechnology includes fields as diverse as surface science, organic chemistry, semiconductor physics, nanofabrication, mechanical engineering and many others. At the nanoscale, new physics, new materials and new technologies lead to new devices, such as quantum memories based on electron spins, graphene sensors or nanocrystal solar cells. This panel will feature five of our younger MTL core faculty around MIT with diverse backgrounds but sharing a common passion for the possibilities of nanotechnology. They will briefly introduce their particular research program and point to the exciting future of nanotechnology.


Panelists:

Dirk Englund, Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor, Department of Physics, MIT
William Tisdale, Charles & Hilda Roddey Career Development Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT
Kripa Varanasi, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT
Michael Watts, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

3:30pm

Break

3:45Pm

Panel Discussion III: Vision for the Future of Nanosystems Applications

Moderator: Anantha Chandrakasan, Keithley Professor and Department Head, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

The application space for nanosystems will expand far beyond the current information and communication products we see today. For example, resonators fabricated with micro/nano machining technology may be used to measure mass in an aqueous environment with a huge resolution improvement or to provide filtering of GHz signals with amazing quality factors. Medical devices capable of continuously monitoring physiological parameters can lead to real-time clinical decision-making, monitoring of disease progression, and titration of therapy. Power generation and conversion by exploiting the unique properties of nitride semiconductors is on the horizon. This panel will feature five of our younger MTL core faculty from around MIT. They will briefly introduce their particular research program and paint a picture of the possibilities that nanosystems might bring to the world during their careers.


Panelists:

Ruonan Han, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Thomas Heldt, Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Career Development Professor, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Scott Manalis, Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor, Department of Biological Engineering, MIT
Tomás Palacios, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT
Dana Weinstein, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

5:00pm

Closing Remarks

Jesús del Alamo, MTL Director & Donner Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

MTL>30 Dinner: October 29, 2014

Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled     View more MTL>30 dinner photos

MTL>30 Symposium: October 30, 2014

Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled     View more MTL>30 symposium photos

 

Do you have any pictures that you'd like to share?